The Wilberforce Society | Papers
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Papers

Writers: Max Gibson, Stacy Young, Thomas Carlile, Matija Franklin Editors: Jun Pang The urgency of planning and implementing sustainable environmental practices cannot be understated. Most recently, world leaders spoke of the pressing need to deal with climate change at COP21, with many heralding the talks as a sign that the international community was finally moving from the realm of words to that of action. However, problems continue to abound as governments grapple with the imperative of ensuring their countries’ growth and development versus that of implementing environmental policies – there remains difficulty in bridging the gap between policy and reality. This paper aims...

Writers: Nora Kalinskij*, Thomas Carlile*, Dominic Bealby-Wright*, Christian Wollny *These authors have equally contributed to the paper. A joint paper of Cambridge University's Wilberforce Society & Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) [gview file="http://thewilberforcesociety.co.uk.gridhosted.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/SyriaGovernmentPaper-1-1.pdf"] ...

Writers: Jun Pang and Vidya Ramesh Editors: Laura Grunberg and Chia Jeng Yang Commissioned by: End Rape on Campus UK Sexual violence is endemic to university campuses and other institutions of higher education. While preliminary engagement with the issue has begun on the part of the education sector and the government in the United States, there remains no comprehensive set of mechanisms for dealing with sexual violence across universities and other institutions of higher education in the United Kingdom. The University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford are compelling examples of the difficulties of instituting simultaneously vertical and lateral processes of disciplinary action and awareness-raising when...

'Wilberforce Watch' is a new series, where we interview the Executive Committee, Editors and authors of The Wilberforce Society to give you a greater insight into the interesting work they do. This week, we caught up with Alicia Loh, one of TWS's Deputy Directors of Policy, who first joined the Society as an Editor. Here are some of the questions we put to her and her answers. When did you first become involved with TWS and in what ways have you been involved since? I joined TWS as an Editor in November 2015, and took on a paper on facilitating innovation in India....

Following the presentation of the paper, Innovations in Developing Countries: The Startup Ecosystem in India by a team of dedicated writers at The Wilberforce Society, which included a talk by Dr Jaideep Prahbu, Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Indian Business & Enterprise at the Judge Business School, the writers were invited to take part in Innovate for India, a conference organised by India Global, a UK based think-tank. The conference lasted two days from the 13th - 14th of May 2016 and attracted venture capitalists, angel investors and notable academics from the UK and India. Among the audience, was also present the...

By Haroun Mahmud On 22 April 2016, The Wilberforce Society met in Keynes Hall, King’s College Cambridge and held a policy paper presentation about ‘The Startup Ecosystem in India’. The paper presentation was the culmination of the research and writing undertaken by a group of Cambridge students. The authors of the paper are: Sarah Wong, Pranjal Bajaj, Charlotte Grace, Vanya Kumar, Viva Avasthi and Ruby Stewart-Liberty, with Alicia Loh as editor. The paper provides policy suggestions to the incumbent Government of India, which has taken a pro-startup stance and evaluates the effectiveness of some of its current policies. The team invited Dr Jaideep...

Writers: Sophie Ashford, Daniel Gayne, Connor MacDonald, Joshua Watts This paper discusses the challenges associated with data use in both political and commercial contexts. In particular, we discuss how organizations and corporations (particularly political parties and telecommunications firms), have used data in recent controversies and elections. In addition, we consider the legal regimes governing data arrangements and usage in a number of jurisdictions, notably Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States. In particular, we note that legal regimes have not kept pace with data usage, particularly in the political sphere. In some cases, notably Australia, this takes the form...

Lead Writers: Zoe Adams, Francois Vanherck Writers: Shani Wijetilaka, Maximilian Campbell, Joshua Richman, Jack LeGresley Editor: Umang Khandelwal The House of Lords is suffering from an identity crisis. This is as much due to short sighted reform efforts as it is to issues of legitimacy. Reform needs to be seen as a priority, conceived as part of a normative vision of the role that the House of Lords could, and should play in the context of the modern British constitution. It is time to recognise that the House of Lords can make a meaningful contribution to our democracy, and defend it against the...

  Writers: Tom Ellis, Walter Myer, Eddie Reynolds, Kartik Upadhyay Editor: Walter Myer Formatted by: Brendan Tan This paper outlines a strategy to improve upon formal and informal recognition of qualifications held by refugees entering the UK. It begins with an overview of UK NARIC, the national body responsible for producing equivalence qualifications. This is followed by discussion of the problem of refugees who lack physical evidence of their qualifications upon arrival. We then turn to the problem of language acquisition, before finally considering official channels of support for refugees as they use their equivalence qualifications to seek employment. In our conclusion, we produce a...

Written by Ewan Lusty Formatted by Brendan Tan Corruption is increasingly on the UK policy-making agenda. In December 2014 the Government published a comprehensive Anti-Corruption Plan, consisting of 66 points for further action in addressing corruption, acting on repeated warnings from journalists, academics, and NGOs about the threat corruption poses in the UK and the need for an active policy response. Although this plan is wide-ranging in its scope and ambition, further thought and discussion is necessary to determine the exact shape of this action. This paper proposes an online service that will act as both an easily accessible reporting mechanism and an...