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Papers

MATIJA FRANKLIN, TEISI TAMMING, SOPHIA GRAEFF BUHL-NIELSEN: WELL-BEING: RETHINKING THE AIMS OF A SUCCESSFUL POLICY - Aug  9th, 2018   Whatever the form or constitution of government may be, it ought to have no other object than the general happiness. -Thomas Paine, 1833   GDP: The existing approach to measuring government policy success There is no single policy measure that can comprehensively capture the state of a society at a given point in time. Currently, GDP is mainly being used as a global proxy for national progress. We argue that this is an incomplete proxy, given that GDP is simply a measure for “the total market value of the goods and services produced by a nation’s economy during a given year”[1]. Most notably, Simon Kuznets, the economist responsible for the development of GDP as an indicator of societal progress, contended that such a measure held value only insofar as it could contribute to an understanding of the well-being

MYRTO VLAZAKI: YEAR 2015 REVEALED THAT NOT ALL IMMIGRANTS WERE BORN EQUAL - September 5th, 2015

This article reflects the views of the author, and not necessarily of The Wilberforce Society, which publishes this article in hopes of spurring a productive discussion on the topic.  

Historically, the traditionally affluent states of Europe have never been particularly receptive to immigrants; especially to impoverished, unskilled, illiterate, religiously heterogeneous migrant groups. Despite its clearly demonstrated reluctance to offer opportunities to groups deemed “undeserving”, Europe has undeniably made some efforts to save face by devising long, complicated, bureaucratic migration policies that would ultimately allow a small fraction, the crème of this group to enter the European land of promise. It has been long since Europe as a continent and the European Union as a politico-economic construct last faced a migration crisis as intense and persistent as that of the years 2014-15 and September 2nd was the day that distinctively set this migration wave apart in the chronicle of European ethics and politics. September 2nd was the day the photograph of drowned three-year-old Aylan Kurdi made the headlines in all major newspapers and other media around the world. September 2nd was also the day that showed - in the most tragic way possible- that not all immigrants were born equal.

Writers: Nora Kalinskij*, Thomas Carlile*, Dominic Bealby-Wright*, Christian Wollny *These authors have equally contributed to the paper. A joint paper of Cambridge University's Wilberforce Society & Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) [gview file="http://thewilberforcesociety.co.uk.gridhosted.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/SyriaGovernmentPaper-1-1.pdf"] ...

Writers: Jun Pang and Vidya Ramesh Editors: Laura Grunberg and Chia Jeng Yang Commissioned by: End Rape on Campus UK Sexual violence is endemic to university campuses and other institutions of higher education. While preliminary engagement with the issue has begun on the part of the education sector and the government in the United States, there...

Following the presentation of the paper, Innovations in Developing Countries: The Startup Ecosystem in India by a team of dedicated writers at The Wilberforce Society, which included a talk by Dr Jaideep Prahbu, Jawaharlal Nehru Professor of Indian Business & Enterprise at the Judge Business School, the writers were invited...

Writers: Sophie Ashford, Daniel Gayne, Connor MacDonald, Joshua Watts This paper discusses the challenges associated with data use in both political and commercial contexts. In particular, we discuss how organizations and corporations (particularly political parties and telecommunications firms), have used data in recent controversies and elections. In addition, we consider the...